Naval, Air, and Space Combat in the Adventure

Introduction

There may well be times when characters in your game, depending on the genre of the game, may travel by sea, air, or even in space. When this happens there is the chance of mishap or even combat. This chapter covers some ideas that you will need to be aware of.

In broad terms, combat in these environs will seem very similar to other kinds of combat. It is this similarity that requires some care in the details. There is enough that is different about these environments to warrant special attention.

The Platform Sheet

The first step when preparing for Naval, Air, or Space combat is to develop a sheet for each type of platform (vehicle) that may be involved. Specify the dimensions and description of the platform.

The first thing to decide are the basic attributes of your platform. The Structural Integrity (SI) is an abstract measure of the physical strength of the platform. The Maneuverability (MI) is an abstract measure of how nimble the platform is. The Propulsion (PR) is an abstract measure of how fast the platform is, and how much power it can produce in more technological settings. The Intellect (IN) is an abstract measure of the computational abilities of the platform; this is 0 unless there is some kind of computer aboard.

Now you must figure out what capabilities your platform has. Does it have weapons? Does it have other defenses? Does it modify the skill of the crew in any way? List every major system on the platform. Determine the size category of the platform (small-scale, normal-scale, etc.) Determine if each system is located in the forward third, the middle third, or the rear third of the platform. Determine the damage capacity of the platform in the same way as for a character; instead of PF you use SI. The same is true for Carrying Capacity.

Now you must create the damage sheet for your platform. Begin with your list of systems in the forward third. Assign a number for each available system. Choose a combination of d10 rolls that most closely fits the number of systems. For example, you have eight systems so you would choose a single d10; you now create two groups of four systems so that you will need a 1-5 on a d10 to get a system from the first group and 6-10 for a system in the second group; you do this again for each group so that you form a total of four subgroups; and then each subgroup has two systems. Do this for the middle third, and the rear third.

Example of an Air Platform: AH-1Q Cobra Attack Helicopter

Medium Scale, 16 meters long with rotors turning, 4200 kg takeoff weight. Medium scale dimensions: 1.6 length, 4.2 weight. This is a two-man platform with a pilot and weapons officer.

SI: 4, MI: 4, PR: 3, IN: 1

Weapons:

M28 Chin Turret (forward) that can carry either:

4 Underwing Hardpoints (middle) on the underside of two wings (2 hardpoints on each side) that can carry either:

Defenses:

Damage Capacity: 6

Systems:

Damage Chart:

FRONT:

1-2 M28 Turret
3 Pilot
4 Weapons Officer
5-6 Flight controls
7-8 Rocket Sight
9-10 M65 Sight System

MIDDLE:

1 Right wing
2 Left wing
3 Voice/data comms system
4 Navigation system
5 Secure voice communications
6 Sperry-Univac Helmet Sight System
7 Avco Lycoming T53-L-13 Turboshaft Powerplant
8 Main rotor
9 Internal fuel system
10 Landing Skids

REAR:

1-5 M130 chaff dispenser
6-10 Tail rotor

Example of a Sea Platform: Trireme (Ancient Galley)

Medium Scale, 37 meters long, 111,000 kg weight. Medium scale dimensions: 3.7 length, 111 weight. This platform has a crew of 170 oarsmen, 30 other crew.

SI: 2, MI: 2, PR: 1, IN: 0

Weapons:

Ram (bow weapon): Great Thrust Damage by Ramming

Defenses:

Damage Capacity: 5

Systems/Damage Chart:

FRONT:

1-5 Roll again

6-10 Roll again

MIDDLE:

1-2 Sail
3 Mast
4 - 5 Upper Tier of Rowers
6 - 7 Middle Tier of Rowers
8 Lower Tier of Rowers
9 Midships Hold
10 Midships Quarters

REAR:

1-2 Rudder
3-4 Galley
5-6 Aft Hold
7-8 Aft Quarters
9-10 Pilot's Station

Example of a Space Platform: Fictional Starfighter

Medium Scale, 18 meters long, 2,000 kg weight. Medium scale dimensions: 1.8 length, 20 weight. This platform has a crew of 1.

SI: 4, MI: 4, PR: 4, IN: 2

Weapons:

Twin Beam Weapon (Front): Medium (medium scale) damage out to 100 km.

10 Underwing Hardpoints; 4 under the fuselage and 3 under each wing, they can carry either:

Defenses:

Damage Capacity: 26

Heavy Armor

Systems:

Damage Chart:

FRONT:

1-2 Beam Weapon
3-4 Pilot
5-6 Flight controls
7-8 Universal Sight
9-10 Missile Targeting System

MIDDLE:

1 Right wing
2 Left wing
3 Voice/data comms system
4 Navigation system
5 Secure voice communications
6 Helmet Sight System
7-8 Powerplant
9 Internal fuel system
10 Landing Skids

REAR:

1-5 Chaff/Flare dispenser
6-10 Vectored Exhaust

Platform Combat

Naval, air, and space combat also occurs within scenes. Just like with individual combat there is no special timing system. The difference is that there are four kinds of scenes; platform detection scenes, platform maneuvering scenes, platform attack scenes, and hero scenes. As you might expect a platform scene involves the action of a platform while a hero scene involves the actions of a one or more hero (character). These should alternate; one scene being a platform scene and the next a hero scene.

The first kind of platform scene is the platform detection scene. Here various platforms attempt to find each other, and/or avoid being found. Relevant ability rolls are made until one platform locates another.

The second kind of platform scene is the platform maneuver scheme. Here various platforms attempt to reach a destination, take evasive action, and/or attempt to move into a good attack position.

The third, kind of platform scene is a platform attack. Here a platform has maneuvered into position and attacks a target. Combat is handled as normal except for damage. Consult the chart below

Penetrated Damage Front Middle Rear Above Deck
-2 Damage Shake 1 Shake 1 Shake 1 Shake 2
-1 Damage Shake 1 Shake 2 Shake 2 Shake 2
0 Damage Shake 2 Shake 2 Shake 2 Shake 3
1 Damage Shake 2 Shake 3 Shake 3 Shake 3
2 Damage Shake 3 Shake 3 Shake 3 Hit
3 Damage Shake 3 Hit Hit Hit
4 Damage Hit Hit Hit Serious Hit
5 Damage Hit Serious Hit Serious Hit Serious Hit
6 Damage Serious Hit Serious Hit Serious Hit Major Hit
7 Damage Serious Hit Major Hit Major Hit Major Hit
8 Damage Major Hit Major Hit Major Hit Catastrophic Hit
9 Damage Major Hit Catastrophic Hit Catastrophic Hit Catastrophic Hit
10+ Damage Catastrophic Hit Catastrophic Hit Catastrophic Hit Catastrophic Hit

Shake: All characters must make a roll to remain at their stations. If they fail this assume they take damage equivalent to falling for each level of the severity of the shaking. This can be negated by having the means to secure characters to their stations (seat-belts, for example).

Hit: roll 1d10

1-3: Shake 1 + Light Flooding/Fire/Decompression
4-5: Shake 2 + Light Flooding/Fire/Decompression
6-7: Shake 2 + Moderate Flooding/Fire/Decompression
8-9: Shake 3 + Moderate Flooding/Fire/Decompression
10: Shake 3 + Moderate Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Light Damage to Systems

Serious Hit: Roll 1d10

1-3: Shake 3 + Moderate Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Light Damage to Systems
4-5: Shake 3 + Moderate Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Light Damage to Systems
6-7: Shake 4 + Moderate Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Light Damage to Systems
8-9: Shake 4 + Heavy Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Moderate Damage to Systems
10: Shake 5 + Heavy Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Moderate Damage to Systems

Major Hit: Roll 1d10

1-3: Shake 5 + Heavy Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Moderate Damage to Systems
4-5: Shake 5 + Catastrophic Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Moderate Damage to Systems
6-7: Shake 5 + Catastrophic Flooding/Fire/Decompression+ Heavy Damage to Systems
8-9: Shake 6 + Catastrophic Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Heavy Damage to Systems
10: Shake 6 + Catastrophic Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Catastrophic Damage to Systems

Catastrophic Hit: Shake 7 + Catastrophic Flooding/Fire/Decompression + Systems Destroyed.

Grades of Damage: Light produces 1 level, moderate produces 5 levels, heavy produces 10 levels, and catastrophic produces 20 levels.

Flooding: The platform is taking on water and may sink if enough compartments fill up. If the platform has no watertight compartments, then the entire platform takes on water. If the flooding is light, then check daily to see if the Flooding Level of the platform increases. If the flooding is moderate then check hourly. If the flooding is heavy, check every few minutes. If the flooding is catastrophic check every minute. If the flooding level of the platform matches the SI of the platform, the comparment is flooded.

Fire: The platform is on fire and will be destroyed if it continues. If the fire is light, then check daily to see if the Fire Level of the platform increases. If the fire is moderate then check hourly. If the fire is heavy, check every few minutes. If the fire is catastrophic check every minute. If the fire level of the platform matches the SI of the platform, then everything in the compartment where the fire was located is destroyed.

Decompression: The platform has developed a leak and will decompress if it is allowed to continue. If the decompression is light, then check daily to see if the Vacuum Level of the platform increases. If the decompression is moderate then check hourly. If the decompression is heavy, check every few minutes. If the decompression is catastrophic check every minute. If the vacuum level of the platform matches the SI of the platform, then the compartment where the leak was located is decompressed; if there are no compartments, then the platform has decompressed.

System Damage: A system has been damaged within the region of the platform. A destroyed system requires replacement or something can be cobbled together with a repair roll at -30.

The Sea Environment

Depending on how much of your world is covered by water, naval combat may play a significant or minor role. In any case, if it is ever a factor then you need to understand the environment.

Drowning occurs when a creature falls into the water and attempts to breath the water. A successful Swimming roll (or similar ability) is required to avoid going under the water. Once you have gone under the water, another roll is required to avoid drowning. If you make the roll you are back above water; a fractional success means you have gotten some air, but you are still under and must make another roll (this time with a -1 detriment); and a failure indicates that you have sucked in a lung full of water and you have entered the first stage of drowning. At this point you can still be rescued and revived with a successful first aid roll (-5 detriment to the roll). If no one revives you in a number of minutes equal to your twice your PF you will die.

Hypothermia occurs when your body temperature drops too far. This can occur even in warm water if the temperature is below that of your body. Prolonged exposure will lead to mild hypothermia; you feel cold, you have mild trembling, and (in game terms) you have a -1 to all ability attempts. Getting warm by drinking warm liquid and/or putting on warm clothes will negate the effects of mild hypothermia in a few minutes. Further exposure will lead to moderate hypothermia; you shiver uncontrollably, you can only walk at half your normal rate, and any ability attempt is difficult (treat as -3 to all ability rolls). Your body core must be warmed to negate the effects of moderate hypothermia, this will reduce it to mild hypothermia. Further exposure leads to severe hypothermia; all skills become impossible to perform, unconsciousness results (8 or less on a d10), and death can result (5 or less on a d10). It is possible to recover from severe hypothermia, this requires a medical skill roll at -20.

The Sea State is a measure of how high the waves are, and how often they will hit you. The range is from 0 to 9. On the list below check for damage once every hour.

Fog can also spring up. This can reduce visibility from two kilometers down to nothing.

As you descend into the water force builds up against the hull, or your body. As you go deeper this force increases. If you go below the crush depth of a platform, the platform has an increasing chance of being destroyed. You must make a roll against the SI of the platform to go, or stay below crush depth. For every tenth of the crush depeth exceeded you gain a -1 modifier. Make a roll every ten minutes. Failure indicates damage by the amount failed.

As you go deeper in the water it also gets darker. Beyond a couple hundred meters it is black as a starless night. This makes the water very cold as you go deeper. There is an ever increasing danger of hypothermia as you go deeper with some protection.

Another factor is that as you go deeper and the pressure increases is that pressure dissolves nitrogen from the air into your blood. If you surface too fast this nitrogen will come out of solution as large bubbles. This is called the bends. A slight case will produce the equivalent of Pain 1 in all joints with confusion and weakness (-1 to all ability attempts). A moderate case will result in Pain 2 from all joints, chest pains, confusion (-2 to all ability attempts), and possibly unconsciousness (1 in 10 chance). A severe case will result in Pain 3 from all joints, chest pains, confusion (-3 to all ability attempts), unconsciousness (1 in 10 chance), and possibly death (2 in 10 chance).

Another problem that can happen occurs when you to hold your breath at a lower depth and then ascend without exhaling. If you ascend in this manner far enough your lungs will expand and rupture, causing massive damage and death. This can happen even if you ascend even ten meters.

Below a depth of 12 meters it is not safe to breathe pure oxygen for more than a few hours. You experience hypoxia under these circumstances (see The Air Environment below). At greater depths oxygen becomes even more dangerous as you develop central nervous system toxicity (CNST), this results in visual disturbances (-1 to all visual perceptions), ringing in the ears (-1 to all ability attempts), then dizziness (-3 to all PF and MA-based ability attempts) and mood swings, then convulsions (-5 to all ability attempts), and finally coma.

Attacking targets on the sea from a platform on the sea can be very difficult. This applies a 0 to -5 modifier to strike such a target. Apply all sea state modifiers to piloting rolls to any attempt to strike a target. Attacking targets on shore from the sea is only half as difficult as attacking another vessel.

Attacking targets under the sea from the surface always applies a -2 to -10 difficulty in addition to the sea state. When targets under the sea are struck they always incur an additional +5 damage.

The Air Environment

If the game you run uses aerial technology (even if it is riding giant birds), then you will need to learn about the atmosphere and how the game deals with aspects of it.

When you fall you experience the acceleration due to gravity. This means that on earth you will fall with increasing velocity of 32 feet per second for every second of acceleration. After one second you have fallen 16 feet and you are falling at 32 feet per second. After two seconds you have fallen 64 feet and you are falling at 64 feet per second. In fact, it takes just under 7 seconds to reach terminal velocity, that is the maximum falling speed. This is around 220 feet per second, and you will have fallen around 780 feet.

In game terms you must make a roll to avoid falling damage, this will be situational and the number of seconds you fall, up to 6, will determine you detriment (-5 for every second after the first). Failure indicates that you have taken damage. This damage will be your damage capacity + the damage factor of the fall for each second. One second produces light damage, two seconds medium damage, three seconds heavy damage, four seconds extreme damage, five seconds great damage, and six seconds tremendous damage. Damage for 1-2 seconds falling is only in one area, damage for 3-4 seconds is in one area and the surrounding areas, above that damage is done in all areas simultaneously.

As you ascend in altitude the temperature will generally decrease. Hypothermia (see The Sea Environment, above) can result. Another problem is freezing of exposed (or even covered) flesh, if given enough time. This is called frostbite. In this game, frostbite occurs in layers. Each layer produces a level of damage; the first produces light damage to exposed flesh resulting in Pain 1. The second layer produces medium damage to exposed flesh. The third produces heavy damage to exposed flesh and light damage (Pain 1) to covered flesh. The fourth produces extreme damage to covered flesh.

Pressure decreases with altitude. Above around 5000 meters decompression starts. This is slow decompression (see The Space Environment, below). You can still breath, but you will notice that you start to get sleepy. This is called hypoxia. For every 100 meters of altitude above 5000 meters (assuming Earth atmospheric pressure) you will receive a -1 modifier to fend off the effects of hypoxia. Above 25000 meters you will experience conditions of pressure similar to that of space (see below).

Wind exerts a force when it pushes against an object. The larger the surface area of the object, the greater the effect of the wind. A breeze might be comforting to a person, but it will cause a tall building to sway, or a large ship to veer off course. Here is the Beaufort wind scale:

In storms, another danger exists beside wind, lightning. If you are struck by lightning there are four effects: Concussion, Burns, Cardiac Arrest, and Brain Injury. Concussion is caused by the shock wave heard as thunder. If lightning hits close to you, you might very well be knocked off your feet; treat it is a Strength 5 attack. If you are actually struck you will likely be burned in your body cavities (or where there is metal on your body); such as your mouth, ears, eyes, etc. Assume that you take a Hit in each area from burns. Cardiac Arrest will occur unless you make a successful PF roll at -3; a fractional result means you recover on your own. If cardiac arrest occurs it will require a First Aid roll at -5 to revive you. Brain Injury occurs if you fail a PF roll at -2. The level of failure indicates how many IN or IU you lose. This injury can be fixed, but it requires a medical roll of some sort at -60.

Attacking targets in the air from a platform in the air is always a challenging task. This applies a -5 to -10 modifier to strike such a target. If a target is struck in the air then a control check of some kind must be made or the platform struck will lose control and begin to fall.

Attacking targets on the ground from the air always applies a -1 to -4 difficulty. When targets on the ground or sea are struck from the air they always incur an additional +5 damage. Attacking targets moving at sea gains an additional -1 to -3 modifier, modify with half the modifier for piloting for the sea state.

Attacking targets under the sea from the air always applies a -2 to -10 difficulty. When targets under the sea are struck from the air they always incur an additional +5 damage.

The Space Environment

If your game allows for space travel then it is important that you understand the environment and its challenges.

Decompression occurs when the body is exposed to vacuum. There are two types of decompression; slow and explosive. Slow decompression occurs when there is a loss of pressure over a long time. Explosive decompression occurs quickly enough to create a loud sound. In either case you have around ten seconds per PF to save yourself by reaching a pressurized compartment, or by restoring pressure. Beyond that time you will be unconscious. If this happens you have a minute per PF before you die; if someone gets you into a pressurized space before that time you will recover within a few minutes per PF.

Massive tissue damage will only occur if you try to hold your breath, then your lungs will explode internally. Another effect is a sleepiness that occurs following decompression caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain, this is called hypoxia. This sleepiness can be overcome by exposure to oxygen. Finally, you will have to check to see if you will suffer from the Bends (see The Sea Environment, above).

Temperature variances in space are extreme. You have all of the adverse effects of high altitude cold. If you are near a star you can also get extreme heat. This can lead to heat injuries. The first level of heat injuries are heat cramps; these generally effect the arms, legs, and abdomen causing Pain 2. The second level of heat injury is heat exhaustion, with the symptoms being headache, excessive sweating, dizziness, nausea, clammy skin; in game terms this results in a -2 to all ability attempts. The third level is the most dangerous, this is heat stroke; the symptoms are hot and dry skin, cessation of sweating, rapid pulse, mental confusion, unconsciousness; in game terms -6 to all ability attempts, unconsciousness (6 or less on a d10), and even death (3 or less on a d10).

Micrometeors are a threat that can be avoided if your platform has light armor on the medium scale. If there is a micrometeor threat, there is a chance of light decompression. Such a result might occur if a 10-10 results on a piloting roll or during a spacewalk.

Dust clouds in space represent subtle, but very dangerous, hazards. If the dust is diffuse then there are 1d10 medium damage hits as your platform passes through it. If the dust is dense, each hit does heavy damage.

Meteors are a greater danger than dust. If a platform is struck by a meteor, determine how much damage it does, usually doing extreme or great damage.

Distances within a star system are measured in Astronomical Units, that is the average distance from the Earth to the Sun (about 93,000,000 miles). Distances between stars are measured in Light Years, or the distance it takes light to travel for one year.

Gravitation is understood to be the attraction between objects due to their mass. A force is exerted between any two objects, this force is gravitation. Unless the objects are large compared to a planet then the gravitation produced is negligible. One consequence of gravitation is that it takes a certain velocity to escape from any moon, planet, or star system. If you cannot produce that velocity, then you will not be able to leave. The ability to produce escape velocity is only abstracted here, you must make a propulsion roll, with the modifier becoming more difficult as the mass of the object you are trying to get away from increases. For a large gas cloud or small moon this should be easy, a giant planet or small star will require more effort (perhaps a -2), a normal star might need a -5, a giant star -10, a black hole would require a roll at -60 or worse!

Attacking objects in space while in space is even harder than aerial combat. The speeds are much faster. There is a -11 to -20 modifier to hit space platforms while in space yourself. If a target is struck in space then a control check of some kind must be made or the platform struck will lose control.

Attacking a stationary platform in space from a moving platform in space is not quite as difficult as that of attacking another spacecraft. The modifier is always from -5 to -10.

When attacking a target on the surface of a planet from orbit there is a -1 to -4 modifier. When targets on the ground or sea are struck from space they always incur an additional +10 damage. Attacking targets moving at sea gains an additional -1 to -3 modifier, modify with half the modifier for piloting for the sea state.

Attacking targets under the sea from space always applies a -2 to -6 difficulty. When targets under the sea are struck from space they always incur an additional +5 damage.

Attacking targets in the air from space always applies a -2 to -6 difficulty. When targets in the air are struck from space they always incur an additional +5 damage. If a target is struck in the air then a control check of some kind must be made or the platform struck will lose control and begin to fall.

The Role of Heroes

Characters can act both in their hero scenes and in the scenes where their unit(s) get to act. In a hero scene the character can act just like any other scene.

In a unit scene a character can perform one of the following acts:

Movement

Units move according to their orders within the time frame of the scene. A unit traveling at 15 kilometers per hour will move 2.5 kilometers every ten minutes. If the unit starts going up a slope reduce the movement by the grade of the slope, thus a 30% grade will increase the distance that must be traveled by 30%. So, if the unit must traverse 300 meters of ground with a 30% grade, this is considered to be 400 meters of ground that must be covered.; at a walking speed (6 kilometers per hour) this will take eight minutes to traverse.

Scouting and Surprise

In order to attack the enemy, you must find them. Huge armies of troops arrayed in precise formations within sight are easy to find and easy to respond to. The same armies moving through mountains or forests can be very difficult to find. The same armies protected from observation by magical means can be nearly impossible to find. For this reason, all armies will have some units trained in scouting. This can be a unit skill, Scouting (d) (IN).

An Example of Mass Combat in the Adventure

In an adventure a force of Borigonians is advancing on a stronghold atop a hill. The forces atop the hill have 24 warrior-slavers armed with axes and bows, 5 shaman, 25 hunters armed with bows, and 60 children armed with axes. The Borigonians have 71 ciridris armed with spears and swords, and 15 hunters armed with bows. We thus have six units: The Warrior-Slaver Unit, The Shaman Unit, The Hunter Unit, The Children Unit, The Borigonian Ciridris Unit, and The Borigonian Hunters Unit. There are also four heroes: Ricmenith, Rikareth, Hesheriuth, and Buntheor.

The GM asks for declarations:

The Warrior-Slavers: Attack the Borigonian Marines. The GM rules that this will take ten minutes to prepare their attack, another five minutes to move into position, and five to attack; a total of twenty minutes.

Shaman: Assist in the Defense of the Stronghold. The GM rules that this will occupy the unit for the rest of the battle and takes no time, since they are already doing this.

Hunters: Assist in the Defense of the Stronghold. The GM rules that this will occupy the unit for the rest of the battle and takes no time, since they are already doing this.

Children: Assist in the Defense of the Stronghold. The GM rules that this will occupy the unit for the rest of the battle and takes no time, since they are already doing this.

Ricmenith: Assume command of the Warrior-Slavers. The GM determines this will take five minutes.

Rikareth: Casting a spell to enhance the abilities of the Warrior-Slavers. The GM rules that this takes only two minutes.

Borigonian Ciridris: Attack the Stronghold. The GM rules that this will take ten minutes to change from a column of march to a line formation, and five minutes to attack; a total of fifteen minutes.

Borigonian Hunters: Directly support the Marines in their advance. The GM rules that they take only a minute to form up, and then they will move forward once the Marines begine their attack.

Hesheriuth: Will use his spirit pact to protect the Marines. The GM determines that this requires two minutes.

Buntheor: Will lead the Borigonian Marines. The GM determines that this requires two minutes.

The GM notes that the Borigonian Hunters get the first scene; so the first scene is a unit scene. The Borigonian Hunters form up to protect the Marines while they change formations. No other unit reacts to this, so no one is allowed to change their declarations.

The GM now conducts a hero scene. In this scene Hesheriuth and Rikareth perform their powers and Buntheor assumes command of the Marines. Hesheriuth uses his Initiation into the Rivemar of 3 as the base power, he modifies this by Knowledge of Totems of 5 and Theology of 5. The GM assigns a +1 due to the use of a difficult skilll and -8 for the use of power under stressful conditions. This gives Hesheriuth a total skill level of 6. He rolls a 1, getting a 5 success; he decides that the effect will last the afternoon, reducing the result to 4; he also decides to make this protection on everyone within a square 10 meters deep by 100 meters wide centered on himself when the spell is cast; this reduces the effect by 3, thus he provides a 1 point magical protection to the entire Borigonian force. Hesheriuth makes a new declaration at this point; he will use his power to make the troops more aware of what is going on. The GM rules that this will take another two minutes.

Rikareth attempts to improve the troops on her side by using the power of the spirit she is initiated to. She uses her skill Initiation into Bunrickordar 4 (d) + Knowledge (Totems) 5 + Basic Ritual Magic 6 for a total of 15. The GM assigns a +1 for using a difficult skill and -8 for using power under stress. The new total is then 8. The d10 roll is 3, for a level of success of 5. Since she is in the fortress, she must expend 4 more points for area of effect for a new total of 1. She decides that this will last an hour, so there is no additional modifier. The effect is to provide a 1 point favorable modifier to any skill attempt by her forces. Rikareth declares that she is taking command of the forces in the Stronghold. The GM rules that this will take five minutes.

Buntheor takes command of the Marine unit. No one reacts to this action.

The GM rules that the next scene will be a unit scene. This scene will last eight minutes. During this scene the Marines change to a line formation with the Borigonian Hunters behind them. The Warrior-Slavers also form up and Ricmineth takes command. No one reacts to these events.

The GM conducts a hero scene next, Hesheriuth conducts his attempt to make the troops more aware. Hesheriuth uses his Initiation into the Rishonind of 3 as the base power, he modifies this by Knowledge of Totems of 5 and Theology of 5, but he also has a 2 point power detriment, for a new level of 11. The GM assigns a +1 due to the use of a difficult skilll and -5 for the use of power under stressful conditions (not as severe as last time, since he is more used to the stress). This gives Hesheriuth a total skill level of 7. He rolls a 2, getting a 5 success; he decides that the effect will last one hour; he also decides to place this awareness on everyone within 100 meters of himself when the spell is cast; this reduces the effect by 4, thus he provides a 1 point favorable modifier to any act involving awareness. Hesheriuth makes a new declaration at this point; he will join the hunters with his long bow.

The GM now conducts a unit scene that lasts three minutes. During this time the Warrior-Slavers complete forming up, Rikareth completes taking charge of the Stronghold forces, and the Borigonians conduct their attack. The GM decides that the Borigonian Marines are in a line formation consisting of three lines of twenty troops and a rear line of eleven. Since they are using 2 meter long spears the first two ranks can attack, this gives the Marines 40 attackers. The defenders are using axes and bows in two ranks of 12; because they are formed up only at the same time as the attack only the first rank will be able to engage.

The hunters will also get two shots before the Marines strike, one will hit the Warrior-slavers and the other the Shaman in the Stronghold. All of the hunters will be able to participate. The fifteen hunters use their Longbow (b) 2 + MA 1 + Stealth and Concealment 2 and Hesheriuth's Awareness of + 1 for a total of 6. The GM decides that aiming is not being done and there is a + 2 for firing into a mass of troops, and -3 for firing on the move, for a 5. The d10 is rolled with a 2 result, the level of success is 3. The d10 is rolled for multiple shots, 5% is the result; this becomes 1 shot; thus there are 14 hits on the enemy for extreme damage (20) + 10 (black steel) + 60 (magic damage) + 3 (hit result) for total damage of 103. The hit location result is thorax. The targets have light armor (5) + 5 (damage capacity) + 9 (d10 roll) gives a level of protection of 19. This still allows 94 damage to get through. Thus 14 of the enemy are killed, leaving only 10 troops with Ricmineth in charge. Hesheriuth also gets to take a shot, he uses his own Longbow skill of 3 + 1 (MA) + 3 (IN) + 1 (Awareness) for a total of 8, with the other modifiers the total level is 7. The d10 roll is a 9, this results in a success; he got an opponent in the arm who was later killed by a hunter.

The Stronghold defenders attempt to react to this, with a +5 modifier and a roll of 7, all of the hunters and shaman are able to react; they fire at the Borigonian hunters. They have 1 (Longbow) + 1 (MA) + 1 (PF) for a total of 3. They are firing downhill at individual targets, so there is a +1 to the level, the total is 4. Hesheriuth provided protection of 1 to each of them, so this becomes a 3. The d10 roll is a 4, resulting in a -1. The result is that only a quarter of their number hit their targets. The hit location is a 5, limb hits. Thus only six hunters are struck, the damage is extreme (20) - 1 for protection - 3 for damage capacity - 60 for magic protection; the attack is totally ineffective.

The Borigonian hunters now turn their attack on the Stronghold defenders. The fifteen hunters use their Longbow (b) 2 + 1 (MA) + 2 (Stealth and Concealment) + 1 (Awareness) for a total of 6. The same modifiers apply as before, but now the defenders are within a fortress, so there is another -5 for that; on the other hand this concentrates the defenders on the walls giving the attackers a +3. The new total is then 2. The d10 roll is a 4, resulting in a success. Of the 15 possible hits, only 4 succeed. The hit location roll is a 6, a joint hit, doing enough damage to destroy the limb and render the individual incapacitated; so 4 defenders become incapacitated; the GM rules them to be hunters. Hesheriuth acts again; again his level is 7, with the modifiers this reduces to a 3 and his roll is a 6; a clean miss.

The Borigonian Marines now attack the remaining Warrior-Slavers. They have 3 (Spear) + 2 (Marching) + 3 (Shield) + 1 (Awareness), for a total level of skill of 9. Since they are charging up hill the GM rules this a challenging task and assigns a -5, for a new level of 4. The d10 roll is 1, giving the Marines a 3 success. There are 5% multiple hits, for a total of 2 such hits. Thus there are 38 separate hits. Since there are only 12 remaining targets, this means that each target gets hit three times. The hit location roll is a 6, joint hits. The damage done is 10 (heavy) + 5 (thrusting) + 3 (hit result) + 3 (damage capacity) for a total damage of 21, less the protection of 19, gives a damage of 2. This results in a Pain 3 wound, resulting in walking wounded status; though this rises to incapacitated status with the multiple wounds.

During this attack Buntheor attacks Ricmineth. She has 6 (Spear) + 4 (Strength) + 4 (MA) + 1 (Awareness) for a total of 15. The GM applies the same modifier as the unit, reducing the level to 10. She rolls a 5, getting a 5. Ricimineth has a skill of 6 with the ax and reduces her attack to -1, a success. She does 10 (heavy damage) + 5 (thrusting) + 10 (Black Steel) + 60 (magic damage) + 6 (damage capacity), for a total damage of 101, which is halved due to the hit result, 61. Ricmineth has 5 (light armor) + 7 (damage capacity) + 60 (magical protection) + 5 (d10 roll) for a total level of protection of 87. Ricmineth is unscathed by Buntheor's attack on him.

The GM decides that it is now time for a new set of declarations...

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